University of Massachusetts Amherst

It's MORE Than A Meal

 

Crediting Foods for CACFP Reimbursement

CACFP regulations: crediting fruits and vegetables

  • Breakfast must contain 1 serving of fruit(s) or vegetable(s) or full-strength fruit or vegetable juice, or an equivalent quantity of any combination of these foods.
  • Lunch and supper must each contain at least 2 separate servings of fruits or vegetables. Full-strength fruit or vegetable juice may count as up to half of this requirement.
  • For snacks, a fruit or vegetable serving may count as 1 of the required 2 components.
  • Juice cannot count as 1 component of a snack when milk is served as the only other component.
  • Cooked dry beans or peas may count as a vegetable or as a meat alternate, but not as both in the same meal.
  • Small amounts (less than 1/8 cup) of fruits and vegetables used as garnishes cannot count toward the fruit and vegetable component.
  • Dishes with more than 1 fruit or vegetable (such as fruit cocktail, mixed fruit, mixed vegetables, or tossed salad) may count toward only 1 of the 2 required components for lunch and supper.
  • Home-canned products cannot be credited due to health and safety reasons. For more information on canned foods, contact your state agency.
Fruits and Vegetables
 
Creditable?
   
Food Item Yes No Comments Nutrition Information
“Ade” drinks (lemonade, limeade, etc.)   X “Ade” drinks are not 100% full-strength juice. “Ade” drinks are usually high in sugar.
Apple butter   X Apple butter does not contain enough fruit for crediting purposes.  
Apple cider X   Apple cider is a full-strength juice. Only pasteurized apple cider should be served.  
Apple fritters, homemade X   Apple fritters may be credited as part of the total requirement for fruits/vegetables if each serving has at least 1/8 cup of apples. Apple fritters are high in fat.
Aspic X   See: gelatin salads  
Banana bread   X Fruit and vegetable breads, such as banana bread or zucchini bread, do not contain enough fruit/vegetable to count toward the fruit/vegetable requirement. They contain less than 1/8 cup per serving. See: grains/breads section for more information.  
Banana pudding X   Banana pudding may be credited based on the amount of fruit in each serving of pudding. Fruit may count as a fruit/vegetable if each serving has at least 1/8 cup of bananas.  
Barbecue sauce   X Barbecue sauce does not contain enough vegetable per serving to be credited. Barbecue sauce may be high in salt. Choose lower sodium varieties or limit the use of barbecue sauce.
Bean sprouts X   Bean sprouts can be credited if at least 1/8 cup are served.  
Beans and peas, canned or dry X   Beans and peas, canned or cooked from dry (kidney, garbanzo, black beans, etc.) may count as a vegetable. They cannot count as a meat/meat alternate and a fruit/vegetable in the same meal. Beans and peas are good sources of protein, fiber, and iron, and are naturally low in fat.
Beverages, fruit   X Fruit drinks (ades, juice drinks, punches) contain less than 50% full-strength juice. They are mainly sugar, flavors, and water.  
Cake containing fruit X   Cakes with at least 1/4 cup fruit per serving can be credited. See: pineapple upside down cake in the grains/breads section for more crediting information.  
Carrot bread   X See: banana bread  
Catsup   X Catsup does not contain enough vegetable to be credited. Catsup has a high sodium content.
Chili sauce   X Chili sauce does not contain enough vegetable to be credited.  
Coconut   X Coconut does not contribute towards the meal pattern. It is considered a nut or seed product. Compared to other fruits, coconut is high in fat. A 1/4 cup serving has about 7 g fat. Most other fruits have less than 1 g fat per serving.
Coleslaw X   Only the fruit/vegetable ingredients can count toward the fruit/vegetable requirement. Cabbage is a good source of vitamin C.
Corn chips   X See: chips in the grains/breads section. Chips are high in fat and salt.
Corn syrup   X Corn syrup is mainly sugar and does not count as a fruit/vegetable.  
Cranberries X     Cranberries are a good source of vitamin C and fiber.
Cranberry juice blend X   Cranberry juice (not cocktail) blended with another full-strength juice is creditable. An example is a blend of 100% cranberry juice and 100% apple juice. Cranberry juice (100%) that is not blended with other juices is not commercially available as a fruit juice.  
Cranberry juice cocktail   X Cranberry juice cocktail contains less than 50% full-strength juice.  
Cranberry relish or sauce X   Only sauces with whole or crushed berries can be credited. Jellied sauces are up to 1/2 sugar and cannot be credited.  
Drinks, fruit   X Fruit drinks contain less than 50% full-strength juice. They are mainly sugar, flavors, and water.  
Dry spice mixes   X    
Fig bar cookies   X The amount of fig in the cookies is too small to count toward the fruit/vegetable component. See: cookies in the grains/breads section for more information.  
Frozen fruit flavored bars (commercial)   X Frozen fruit flavored bars do not contain enough fruit juice to be creditable.  
Frozen fruit juice bars (homemade or commercial) X   The fruit juice portion of the bars may count toward the fruit/ vegetable requirement. Commercial fruit juice bars with 100% juice can count. Other commercial fruit juice bars cannot count because it is impossible to determine the amount of fruit juice in each bar.  
Fruit in breads or muffins (banana, carrot, cranberry, pumpkin, zucchini, etc.)   X See: banana bread.  
Fruit cobblers (homemade) X   The fruit may contribute toward the fruit/vegetable requirement if 1 serving has at least 1/8 cup fruit. See: cobbler in the grains/breads section for more crediting information. Depending on the recipe, many fruit cobblers may be high in sugar and fat.
Fruit crisps (homemade) X   The fruit may contribute toward the fruit/vegetable requirement if 1 serving has at least 1/8 cup. See: fruit pie filling below, and crisp in the grains/breads section for more crediting information. Fruit crisps may be high in fat.
Fruit, dried X   Check the Food Buying Guide for serving sizes of various dried fruits.  
Fruit drinks   X See: drinks, fruit in this section.  
Fruit flavored punch   X Fruit flavored punch does not contain a sufficient amount of full-strength juice. Fruit punch is high in sugar.
Fruit flavored powders and syrups   X Fruit flavored powders and syrups do not contain a sufficient amount of fruit to contribute toward the fruit/vegetable requirement. Fruit flavored powders are mainly sugar and flavoring.
Fruit juice bases   X Fruit juice bases do not contain a sufficient amount of fruit to contribute toward the fruit/vegetable requirement.  
Fruit pie filling, commercial (except lemon pie filling) X   If the first item in the ingredient list is fruit, the filling may provide one-half credit (1/2 cup of fruit pie filling will provide 1/4 cup of fruit credit). The use of fruit pies to meet the fruit/vegetable requirement should be limited due to high fat and sugar contents.
Fruit pie filling, homemade (except lemon pie filling) X   In a homemade or center-made pie, the amount of fruit can be credited based on the amount of fruit in each serving. The use of fruit pies to meet the fruit/vegetable requirement should be limited due to high fat and sugar contents.
Fruit sauces, homemade X   The fruit portion of the sauce may be credited. One serving must provide a minimum of 1/8 cup (2 Tbsp.) of fruit.  
Fruit snacks   X It is impossible to determine the amount of fruit in products such as fruit bars, roll-ups, wrinkles, or candy.  
Gelatin salads or desserts with fruit/fruit juice/ vegetable X   The fruit/vegetable in gelatin salads or desserts may be credited toward the fruit/ vegetable requirement if each serving contains at least 1/8 cup fruit, vegetable, or full-strength fruit or vegetable juice.  
Gravy bases   X    
Honey   X    
Ice cream, fruit flavored   X Fruit flavored ice cream contains an insufficient amount of fruit to credit toward the meal pattern.  
Jam   X Jam contains an insufficient amount of fruit per serving to credit toward the meal pattern. Jams are high in sugar.
Jelly   X Jelly contains an insufficient amount of fruit per serving to credit toward the meal pattern. Jellies are high in sugar.
Juice bars X   Juice bars made from 100% juice can be credited.  
Juice blends – all fruit juice X   Juice blends that are made of full-strength juices can be credited. Only pasteurized fruit juices should be served.  
Ketchup   X Ketchup does not contain enough vegetable to be credited. Ketchup has a high sodium content.
Kiwi fruit X   ¼ cup serving = about 6 slices of ¼ inch each Kiwi is a good source of vitamin C.
Kool-Aid   X See: fruit-flavored powders  
Lefsa X   Lefsa is an unleavened bread made primarily of potatoes and flour. Lefsa with at least 1/8 cup potato per serving is creditable as a fruit/vegetable. See: lefsa in the grains/breads section. Lefsa is often served with butter, brown sugar, jams, or cinnamon and sugar. These toppings are high in fat and/or sugar.
Lemon pie filling   X Lemon pie filling contains an insufficient amount of fruit per serving.  
Lemonade   X Lemonade cannot be credited because it must be diluted beyond the 50% fruit juice level and have sugar added to be palatable.  
Maple syrup   X    
Mayonnaise   X    
Muffins with fruit   X See: banana bread.  
Mustard   X    
Nectar (apricot, pear, peach, etc.)   X Nectars usually contain less than 50% full strength juice.  
Oil, salad   X    
Olives X   Olives can be credited if each serving is at least 1/8 cup (2 Tbsp.). Olives are high in salt and fat.
Onion rings X   Onion rings are creditable if they are homemade, or if a product specification sheet is available that states the amount of onion. Fried onion rings are high in fat.
Pickles X   Pickles can be credited if each serving is at least 1/8 cup (2 Tbsp.). Pickles are high in sodium.
Pickle relish   X Pickle relish is considered a garnish or condiment.  
Pineapple upside down cake X   See: cake containing fruit.  
Pizza sauce X   At least 1/8 cup (2 Tbsp.) per serving is needed. 1/8 cup of pizza sauce = 1/8 cup vegetable.  
Pop Tart filling   X See: toaster pastry filling.  
Popsicles   X Popsicles contain an insufficient amount of fruit juice for crediting. Popsicles are high in sugar.
Posole   X Posole is a thick soup. It usually contains pork or chicken, broth, hominy, onion, garlic, dried chili peppers, and cilantro.  
Potato chips   X   Potato chips are high in fat and salt.
Potatoes and potato skins X     Potato skins are high in fiber. Potatoes and potato skins can be high in fat if fried. Toppings such as sour cream, cheeses, butter, or margarine are also high in fat.
Preserves   X Preserves contain an insufficient amount of fiber per serving for crediting.  
Pumpkin in bread   X See: banana bread.  
Pudding with fruit X   The pudding must contain at least 1/8 cup or 2 Tbsp. fruit per serving.  
Raisins X   1/4 cup raisins = 1/4 cup fruit. Larger serving sizes may be impractical. Serve raisins with other fruits or vegetables. Raisins are high in sugar (1/4 C has almost 3 Tbsp. sugar). They are high in iron and fiber.
Rice   X Rice is a grain. See: rice in the grains/breads section.  
Salad dressing   X    
Salsa X   Salsa with all vegetable ingredients and small amounts of spices or flavorings is creditable. At least 1/8 cup (2 Tbsp.) is needed. 1/8 cup salsa = 1/8 cup vegetable. If salsa contains non-vegetable components such as gums, starches, or stabilizers, only the vegetable portion may be credited.  
Sherbet   X Sherbet contains an insufficient amount of fruit for crediting.  
Sorbet X   Sorbet made from 100% juice is creditable.  
Soup, canned, condensed (1 part soup to 1 part liquid): clam chowder; minestrone; split pea; tomato; tomato with basic components such as rice or vegetables; vegetable with basic components such as meat or poultry X   Based on reconstituted soup: 1 cup soup = 1/4 cup vegetable
1/2 cup soup = 1/8 cup vegetable
A serving of less than 1/2 cup soup does not contribute to the fruit/vegetable requirement.
Broth-based soups with a variety of vegetables can be a nutritious, low-calorie main dish or accompaniment to a meal. Cream-based soups are high in fat. Some canned soups may be high in sodium.
Soup, canned, ready-to serve: clam chowder; minestrone; split pea; tomato; tomato with basic components such as rice or vegetables; vegetable with basic components such as meat or poultry X   1 cup soup = 1/4 cup vegetable
1/2 cup soup = 1/8 cup vegetable
A serving of less than 1/2 cup soup does not contribute to the fruit/vegetable requirement.
Broth-based soups with a variety of vegetables can be a nutritious, low-calorie main dish or accompaniment to a meal. Cream-based soups are high in fat. Some canned soups may be high in sodium.
Soup, canned: beef with vegetables and barley; beef, chicken, or turkey noodle; chicken gumbo; chicken with rice or stars; cream of celery, cream of chicken; cream of mushroom; French onion; homestyle beef or chicken; pepper steak; chicken corn chowder   X These types of canned soups contain an insufficient amount of vegetable to contribute toward the fruit/vegetable requirement. Broth-based soups with a variety of vegetables can be a nutritious, low-calorie main dish or accompaniment to a meal. Cream-based soups are high in fat. Some canned soups may be high in sodium.
Soup, dehydrated soup mix X   Dehydrated vegetables may be credited; their yields must be based on the rehydrated volume, not the dry volume stated on the label. Rehydration yields vary from brand to brand. To determine the vegetables’ rehydrated volume: (1) rehydrate them by adding liquid according to the manufacturer’s directions; (2) measure their rehydrated volume; (3) calculate the number of servings provided; (4) keep a record of yield data for referral. Dry soups may be high in sodium.
Soup, homemade X   When making homemade soups, use a quantity of vegetables that results in at least 1/8 cup (2 Tbsp.) vegetable per serving for crediting purposes.  
Spaghetti sauce X   At least 1/8 cup (2 Tbsp.) per serving is needed to be credited.
1/8 cup spaghetti sauce = 1/8 cup vegetable.
 
Sprouts: alfalfa, bean, etc. X     Sprouts are a potential food safety hazard.
Squash in bread   X See: banana bread.  
Toaster pastry filling   X These do not contain enough fruit to count toward the fruit/vegetable requirement. See: toaster pastry in the grains/breads section.  
Tomato paste X   1 Tbsp. = 1/4 cup vegetable  
Tomato puree X   2 Tbsp. = 1/4 cup vegetable  
Tomato sauce X   1/4 cup = 1/4 cup vegetable  
V-8 juice X   See: vegetable juice blends.  
Vegetable juice blends X   Vegetable juice blends are mixed, full-strength vegetable juices. Vegetable juice blends may contain a variety of nutrients. However, they may be high in sodium.
Vegetable, chopped X   Vegetables may count toward the meal pattern if each serving has least 1/8 cup (2 Tbsp.) vegetables.  
Vinegar   X    
Wild plants X   USDA does not recommend using wild plants due to the possibility of gathering look-alikes or poisonous plants. Mustard or dandelion greens, if used, should be purchased from a reputable commercial source. Dark green leafy vegetables and greens are good sources of iron and vitamin A.
Yogurt with fruit, commercial   X Commercially prepared yogurt with fruit contains less than 1/8 cup fruit per serving. Fruit added to yogurt is creditable. See meat/meat alternates section for crediting yogurt.  
Zucchini bread   X See: banana bread.  

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